Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums

Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Trailblazer Award Acceptance Speech at the 2016 Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums Conference

In this video, Ben Nighthorse Campbell, retired United States Senator from Coloarado, accepts the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums' Trailblazer Award. In his acceptance speech, he discusses some of his legislative acheivements impacting Native Americans including his role in creating the National Museum for the American Indian and passing the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. He concludes his speech by affirming his committment to keep working to improve conditions in Native American communities.

Kevin Gover, Introduction of Ben Nighthorse Campbell at the 2016 Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums Conference

In this video, Kevin Gover, Director of the National Museum of the American Indian, introdcues Ben Nighthorse Campbell, recipient of the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museum's Trailblazer Award. Gover describes Campbell's legislative achievements on behalf of Native Americans as a United States congressman and senator. Gover also describes his professional relationship with Campbell.

Bruce Bernstein, Report on Repatriation Summit at the 2016 Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums Conference

In this video, Bruce Bernstein, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer at the Pueblo of Pojoaque, reports on the Repatriation Summit held on October 10, 2016, prior to the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums conference. He describes a draft document from the Summit aimed at making recommendations for improving NAGPRA and calls for comments for revision.

Peggy Mainor and Della Warrior, Introducing the Mica Group's Guide for Successful Language Revitalization at the 2016 Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums Conference

In this video, Peggy Mainor, Executive Director of the Mica Group, describes the Mica Group's guide to successful language revitalization programs, which they are currently drafting. She solicits input on the project. Della Warrior, Founding Member of the Mica Group, describes the work of the Mica Group, which provides funding and consultation for projects related to the preservation of language and cultural heritage.

Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Report on National Museum of the American Indian Study on Professional Development for Museum Staff

In this video, Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Assistant Director for Collections at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), announces that NMAI is concluding its survey on the professional development needs and opportunities for museum staff at tribally funded cultural heritage institutions. She also encourages the audience to participate in a session on professional development.

Kathryn Matthew, Report on Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants

In this video, Kathryn Matthew, Director of the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), describes some grants awarded by IMLS to Tribal cultural heritage institutions. She also describes a collaborative relationship between the IMLS and its partners. Through these agreements partners provide expertise on collections and the communities they serve and IMLS provides financial resources and professional best practices, where needed.

2015 ATALM NANH Meeting: Presentations from Jilkaat Kwan Heritage Center, the Kanza Museum, Sealaska Heritage Institute, and the Micmac Museum

This panel consists of speakers discussing their Native American/Native Hawai'ian (NANH) Musueum Services Program funded projects. The first speaker, Lonnie Hotch, from the Jilkaat Kwaan Heritage Center, discusses a project to install the Whale House Collection and complimentary projects to build a cultural center and visitor center and plans for upcoming exhibits. Crystal Douglas, Kanza Museum Director, discusses a collaboration between her institution and the language program that resulted in the creation of a language learning app and a virtual tour that contains oral histoires of the last full-blood members of the Kaw Nation. Chuck Smythe, from the Sealaska Heritage Institute, discusses a project to create an exhibit based on four core values key to the aboriginal peoples of Southeast Alaska. Finally, Jennifer Pictou, Tribal Historic Preservaton Officer at the Micmac Museum, discusses how the museum worked with the NANH to decrease the scope of an over-ambitious grant application to prioritize the creation of policies to ensure the proper care and management of the museum's collections. This meeting took place as part of the pre-conference activities for the 2015 ATALM annual conference in Washington, DC on September 9, 2015.

2015 ATALM NANH Meeting: Presentations from Eyaawing Museum, Squamish Museum, Hula Preservation Society, and Huhugam Heritage Center

This panel consists of speakers discussing their Native American/Native Hawai'ian (NANH) Musueum Services Program funded projects. The first speaker, Cindy Winslow, Director of the Eyaawing Museum and Cultural Center, discusses a project to preserve the Durant Roll, which was used to establish federal recognition. Janet Smoak, Director at the Squamish Museum, discusses a grant used to process an archaeological collection from the Manette site consisting of shell samples and describing it in a Past Perfect database. Keau Gorge, from the Hula Preservation Society, discusses a project to document Hula culture that consists of oral histories, documents, moving images, and photographs. Finally, Monica King, Education Curator at the Huhugam Heritage Center, discusses the documentation of basket weaving tradition within the Gila River Indian community. This meeting was part of the pre-conference activities for the 2015 ATALM annual conference in Washington, DC on September 9, 2015.

2015 ATALM Museum Summit: Training and Educational Challenges and Opportunities for Native Peoples

In this panel, Joe Horse Capture, Associate Curator; Marian Kaminitz, Conservator; Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Asistant Director for Collections; and Kevin Gover, Director, all at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC, discuss the ways in which museums can contribute to the training and professional development of Native students to work in museums. In particular, they provide an overview of the opportunities -- internships and fellowships -- that the Smithsonian and other institutions offer to Native students in the US. Finally, Kevin Gover addresses issues surrounding the care of Indigenous collections according to Indigenous traditions and protocols, as well as the importance of including Native voice into museums in order to change wrong and inaccurate narratives and representations of Indigenous peoples. This panel was part of the Museum Summit during the pre-conference activities for the 2015 ATALM annual conference in Washington, DC on September 9, 2015.

2015 ATALM Archives Summit: Introduction to Protocols for Native American Materials

In this panel, Jennifer O'Neal, Corrigan Solari University Historian and Archivist at University of Oregon, begins the Archives Summit by reviewing the summit's schedule and topics covered. She provides a brief overview on the protocols for Indigenous collections in the US and Canada and discusses the ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations can collaborate by incorporating these protocols into instruction. Karen Underhill, Head of Special Collections and Archives at Northern Arizona University, introduces the Protocols for Native American Materials and discusses their origins. Jennifer O'Neal concludes by discussing the goals of the Protocols, which are based on the history of collecting, creating, and documenting collections of Indigenous cultures. This panel was part of the Archive Summit, which took place as part of the pre-conference activities for the 2015 ATALM annual conference in Washington, DC on September 9, 2015.